Posts

The Tissue Box

The Tissue Box

The tissue box.

It just a part of the room.

Yet you know why it sits there. Read more

Not-So-Supportive Comments About Disabilities

Not-So-Supportive Comments About Disabilities

Hi it is Isabella again! Today I would like to talk about things that people say that they think are supportive but are very insulting. My parents tell me to show them grace because they do not understand how they are offending people. Let me help educate you because one of these days I am going to snap and slap someone.

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The Battle of Education With a Disability

The Battle of Education With a Disability

School is hard on everyone. Schooling with a disability is a different kind of difficulty. I grew up in a small town and I had to adamantly fight for accessibility and my own academic rights as a child. If there is one thing I truly give my mother the utmost credit and respect for, it is certainly how hard she stomped in her heels down those hallways for all of those years attempting to prove to the school system that despite the fact that I learned differently than my peers, it didn’t make me less intelligent. As we raged on together, I was quite aware at the time of exactly how prolific this battle was, and how history would repeat itself. Time and time again. Read more

Brief Reflections in Self-Advocacy

Brief Reflections in Self-Advocacy

I have a confession:

There have been times where someone says something offensive toward me in regard to my disabilities, and I do not speak up. Instead, I answer their really uncomfortable and perhaps rude inquiries with a smile. I do not announce myself in conversation, I don’t let them know that the word “retarded” and “cripple” have been used against me growing up, as opposed to poking fun at myself, those words were poking fun at me and hurting me. Read more

Teaching Children About Disabilities

Teaching Children About Disabilities

How and what do we teach our children about the world of disabilities and illnesses? How do you explain a spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, the complications and aftermath of cancer treatments to a child? How much is too much information? What is age appropriate information and how do you approach the subject without making young children afraid of these things? We want to educate and provide information without making them scary or something to fear either from others or from happening to them personally. Discussing these things with your children is much easier than one might imagine and it’s extremely important. You are the most important teacher your child will ever have in life and it’s your job as a parent to prepare them for the realities of life. It’s also your job to teach them to be open to differences in people whether it’s race, a disability, or that an illness does not define a person. Read more

All Eyes on You

All Eyes on You

Having an obvious sign of an illness or physical disability such as a wheelchair can often leave us being the center of unwanted attention. Some people relish the attention and want to use it as an opportunity to be a sounding board for education or sharing their personal passions. Other people want to blend into the background and hide while screaming stop looking at me. It’s very different and frustrating when you feel like your injury or illness is the focal point of all attention and not you as a person. This doesn’t bother my husband to have people staring at him when we are out in public, although he is still self conscious about his legs. I on the other hand find myself angry and have several shirts that state things such as, “Don’t worry it’s only cancer!”. Read more

How to be Awkward

How to be Awkward

How to make someone like me uncomfortable: Seven suggestions designed to give both parties seething embarrassment. Read more

Sharing My SCI Story

Sharing My SCI Story

Whether big or small, people face challenges everyday. These challenges can become roadblocks: some they can easily step over, some they can navigate around, and others are just too high to climb on their own. Ever since I started writing about my life, my goal was to show people that no matter what “roadblock” they may be facing, there’s always a way to get past it, even if you have to go straight through it head-on. Read more

Busy Special Needs Family Routine

Back to School: The Return of a Hectic Schedule

Hazy Shades

Time time time…. See what’s become of me..

Remember that eighties song? So fitting for my life these days. I thought when Roa started Kindergarten and Gunnar went to preschool a few hours 3 days a week, I would be swimming in a giant pool of time! Not so much. Read more

Individualized Education Plan

The Season of the IEP

We walked into the building holding hands and breathing deep, unsure of what the next hour would bring. It’s that time of the year at school. End of the year testing, planning for the next, and the IEP (Individualized Education Plan) meeting. The last two years, no worries. We had a great team of teachers and therapists who knew Roa and his abilities. They were amazing at including him in the preschool routine and adapting things to suit his needs. But this year, the game has changed. Roa is entering Kindergarten this fall. He is changing teachers, therapists, bus drivers and school building. This IEP meeting was entered with a touch of anxiety and a pinch of apprehension. Read more