Posts

Elevator Seat for Power Wheelchairs: Accessibility

10 Years With, 10 Years Without: The Elevator Seat

It’s not hard to imagine a better life when you have something as vastly different as an elevator seat on a wheelchair.  When you are a full-time wheelchair user, having this function can completely change your world.

It’s like having a Flintstones car and then having a car with a motor. The elevator seat is by far one of the most coveted add-ons for power wheelchairs. When I first heard about them, I of course wanted one right away, but it didn’t finally happen for me until 2005. I was even able to get it covered by insurance since I need it for work. Read more

The Word is Disabled

The Word is Disabled

That’s right we’re talking about that word again, disability, and other words honestly do not apply to the situation. I’m all for using different terms for children and teaching them to see their differences as a positive rather than a negative. I think of words like ‘differently abled’ the same as I do Santa. We know it’s not real, but why kill a child’s innocence when you can raise their self esteem instead. You on the other hand my grown up delicate little spring violets are disabled. I’d like to bring attention to some new terms I learned from the comments on a past blog that literally had me laughing until I cried. We also need to remember that the word ‘disabilities’ does not only apply to mobility issues, but also to illnesses, mental health, and neurological problems. Let’s face it. If it can’t be fixed it’s a disability. I know everyone is offended by something, but calm down, it’s a medical term. Read more

All About Isabella

All About Isabella

Hi everyone it’s Isabella! Since I am writing blogs for you all I thought it would be fun to tell you a little bit about myself and my life so you can understand me a little more even though my dad and mom have already written about me. It makes me feel proud that my parents talk about my sisters and I so much. I love my parents a lot and they love us. I think my parents did a good job at raising me to know how to live a good life and will with my sisters too. My parents are very strict and my mom says it is because too many kids try to grow up too quickly. My friends say that my parents are very old fashioned because they have to meet my friends families before we can hang out and there has to be an adult there even though I am old enough to not need a babysitter. They say it is the world that needs babysitting Read more

Dating as a Teen With a Disability

Dating as a Teen With a Disability

Hi everyone! It is Isabella again! Today I would like to talk about what it is like to date and meet people as a teenager with a disability. It is hard to have self confidence when you are a teenager. Why is everybody so dang mean? It is really hard to have high self esteem in a world full of people putting you down constantly. Read more

My Life with Mental Illness

My Life with Mental Illness

September is Suicide Awareness Prevention Month. In an effort to end the stigma surrounding suicide and mental illness, we will be publishing several first hand experiences and promote information and resources available to those in need. Trigger Warning: This post contains details about mental illness and suicide attempts.

Since my accident a decade ago leaving me with a spinal cord injury and TBI I have been diagnosed with several mental illnesses that are far harder to deal with than any physical limitations. I have Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and I am also bipolar. This is not exactly the easiest of blogs for me to write, but I think that it’s needed. I do still feel some level of shame, guilt, embarrassment, or whatever the word is for it over having this label and that is part of the reason that I am writing it. There is a stigma attached to having a mental illness when it should be seen and treated with the same empathy, not pity, as any other medical condition. Read more

Embarrassed for Being Attracted to a Disabled Person

Embarrassed for Being Attracted to a Disabled Person?

There are a lot of difficult things about living life as a wheelchair-user – spotty to widespread inaccessibility, overpriced medical equipment, seeing everyone at butt level (this is really one of the worst)- but one of the most maddening aspects of all is the social stigma that comes along with using a wheelchair. Read more

Is the Word "Disability" Offensive?

Is the Word “Disability” Offensive?

My wife wrote a blog recently that came under attack because she used the word disabilities. What is the definition of a disability? It is a loss of a physical or mental function. Read more

Have We Become Too Sensitive?

Have We Become Too Sensitive?

Ever since the whole Kylie Jenner thing (the famous model who posed in a wheelchair for a photoshoot) occurred, and the disabled community’s intense response, something has been heavily weighing on my mind – I think we’ve become too sensitive. Read more

The Power of Words

The Power of Words

Every single time someone called me “pretty” growing up, I cringed. As an adult, it’s taken some time and an acknowledgement of ugly days, but I can accept the compliment. I can feel pretty, and that, as a woman and as a woman with a disability is quite the achievement. I already tapped into the acceptance of my body and the celebration in owning said body, but it’s been a long hard road. Let me paint you a picture of an awkward, lanky redheaded girl with glasses far too big for her face. Now, I know that growing up is hard for women in general. You swoon over your crush who sits a couple seats ahead of you in homeroom, you shyly write your name with theirs. We’ve all been there, but when you bring disability into the equation, it was adding insult to adolescent injury. Your hair’s too frizzy? Perfect. There’s a product for that! But there’s nothing to allow you to walk in the heels that you see your peers clanking around in. There’s nothing that’s going to fix the fact that you know he asked for your number as a joke, but in order to play along with your peers, you gave it to him anyway and nothing is going to fix the heartbreak that came along with waking up from your first surgery in first grade thinking you’re now able to walk, You’re now able to be like everyone else, and the crushing realization that that’s not the reality. Everyone goes through a phase where they’re growing into their noses, their ears, their shoes. I had to grow into ownership of my disability and how it coexists with my womanhood. Read more

Approaching Someone with a Disability

Approaching Someone with a Disability

How do you treat someone with a disability? A lot of people are unsure of how to handle this situation in public settings. It’s really not hard people. Treat them like you’d want to be treated. We’re not freaks of nature. We can hear when you talk about us instead of to us. We can answer for ourselves. Please don’t ask the person we’re with to speak our thoughts for us. That is probably my number one pet peeve in dealing with society. Talk to us at an age appropriate level. Most people are not bitter from a disability. We are bitter about being treated as though we can’t function at all. Read more