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5 Ways to Get Cool FAST with a Spinal Cord Injury

5 Ways to Get Cool FAST with a Spinal Cord Injury

The human body is a marvel. Somehow it ended up with the ability to cool itself via sweat, but when you have a spinal cord injury this ability is turned off. Many are shocked to hear this, but when you have a spinal cord injury, you really can no longer sweat. Not surprisingly, this can cause some pretty gnarly health scares. Read more

Overheating After an SCI

Overheating After an SCI

Before my accident I knew almost nothing about spinal cord injuries. I definitely did not know that you lost the ability to sweat below your level of injury. While it’s weird at least my wife can’t complain that my feet stink. This was definitely an issue before my accident. Boots are not breathable and the funk was strong in this one. Read more

Living’ the Cold-Blooded Quad Life

Living’ the Cold-Blooded Quad Life

When the doctors first told me I was cold-blooded after my accident, I didn’t believe them. “How was that a possible?” I thought. I know one of the worst things in the world happened to me, I broke my neck, but I didn’t transform into an amphibian while I was at it. How can a human be cold-blooded? I was utterly confused. Read more

New Stay-Cool Tricks for SCI: 2016 Edition

New Stay-Cool Tricks for SCI: 2016 Edition

The heat is finally on again this year, and oh Lordy does it seem to be getting hotter every year I’ve been paralyzed. With icecaps melting and record highs already happening across the US, I couldn’t think of a better time for a brand new list of items to help you stay cool. Read more

Weather and Wheelchairs

Weather and Wheelchairs

How does the weather effect a wheelchair user? The weather has a great deal of influence on your day if you are disabled. As if we didn’t have enough to think about before? I guess not, because there it is in your face. Read more

Regulating Body Temperature With an SCI

Regulating Body Temperature With an SCI

Having an SCI and being on a ventilator can present challenges for maintaining body temperature through extreme temperature changes. Because of my injury, I’m unable to feel if I’m cold or hot. The only way I know is by using a thermometer, often when it’s too late. Also, the temperature in the air can be very hard on my lungs because I’m on a ventilator. Read more

Flag over Lake

Handling Extreme Temperatures after Spinal Cord Injury

This Summer Deserves a High-Five

Last spring I wrote a piece for this blog called “This Past Winter Deserves a High Five.” My weather-based jubilance stemmed from the fact that I had just lived through the warmest winter of my life. Winters can be harsh on wheelchair users-especially in Wisconsin and Minnesota, the only two states I’ve lived in-for a variety of reasons, such as the difficulty of wheeling around in the snow, awful parking issues, and the ramp on my van acting temperamental due to the extreme temperatures. The winter before that was the worst winter of my life because the Minneapolis area got nailed with a hands-down state record 30+ inch snowstorm at the beginning of December and just like that it became the longest and least accessible winter season I’ve ever experienced. Just awful. So having a winter where we barely got any snow, it barely reached sub-zero temperatures, and that it even reached 55 degrees at some point in late January or early February was truly something to celebrate. It was awesome. Read more