Surprise! Infomercials Are For Us

Surprise! Infomercials Are For Us

Many people chuckle at the frustrations illustrated by people in infomercials, and cry out “Lazy!”. I don’t fault them for this, but if you look closely, you’ll notice the seemingly simple task is a struggle. 

This is life with disability. Snuggies are perfect for individuals that may have trouble retaining body heat and taking a coat on and off while sitting down. Gadgets that promise to make cooking a breeze by breaking egg yolks benefit people with tremors. Same thing with juice container spouts, promising to make pouring a drink a lot less of a mess and hassle. There’s even a nail trimmer that boldly states the tiny motored device can file and trim your nails for you. Which, provided it works well, could be perfect for someone who struggles with fine motor skills. There’s even spray can nail polish! All you have to do is wash your hands with water after spraying it on your fingers and you have a manicure. Do you know how long I struggled with teaching myself how to paint my nails? Quite a while.

I recently ran into Whole Foods and noticed that they were offering prepped (peeled) oranges in plastic containers. Now, I’m not certain whether they are available anymore, as the company got a lot of flack for it. However, many within the disabled community sang their praises due to the fact that peeling oranges was no longer a struggle for them. 

These devices, as silly as they seem, are marketed toward one of the most invisible minority groups in a rather underhanded way, using able bodied people to pander to the disabled community. So the next time you have yourself a chuckle about the laziness of a man who struggled to pour juice before that 1-800 number popped up on your screen, ask yourself why that is.

Ask yourself who could benefit from these products. 

1 reply
  1. Andrew Burch
    Andrew Burch says:

    Okay, I can see your point but then you must ask yourself, if these companies were selling their products geared toward the disabled community then why are they even advertising on TV? Their resources would be better spent somewhere else geared toward us. Also, why do they obviously make their adds so geared toward able bodied people instead of pointing out who their market base is? I’d argue that these companies made their projects with the able bodied crowd in mind not realizing we were their better or true market base and they don’t realize this or that their product could be better marketed toward us and if they had then they wouldn’t receive the amount of puns they do from the AB crowd for their poor marketing.

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